• Farm Woman (Half-Length)

    Artist:
    Picasso, Pablo. 1881-1973
    Technique:
    oil
    Dimensions:
    81x56 cm

Picasso, Pablo. 1881-1973

Farm Woman (Half-Length)

France, 1908

Picasso spent the late August and autumn of 1908 in the vicinity of Paris, in a small village of La Rue-des-Bois. It was there that he did the painting “Farm Woman”, a peculiar portrait of the mistress of the house, where he stayed, which has become a vivid and uncompromising embodiment of the artist’s haunting idea about the inherent inveteracy of human nature, about dormant , undeveloped consciousness. The “Farm Woman”, as many other works of Pablo Picasso, is the glorification of human flesh. It is represented by the impressively precise and laconic language of geometric marks: a head is a sphere, a neck is a cylinder, and a trunk is a cube. This particular design logic renders monolithic character to the figure. The body’s volume is static and sizeable. The female figure appears to be carved out of a wooden block, it is monumental and solid. One can feel a deep seated, powerful primeval force, fed by nature itself. "I don’t paint from nature, but close to it", Picasso used to say. "I wish to represent the world the way I imagine it". While reflecting on man as God’s creation, the artist, does not fear to be impartial, harsh and frighteningly grotesque.

Title:

Farm Woman (Half-Length)

Place:

Date:

Material:

Technique:

oil

Dimensions:

81x56 cm

Acquisition date:

Entered the Hermitage in 1930; handed over from the State Museum of New Western Art in Moscow; originally in the Sergei Shchukin collection

Inventory Number:

ГЭ-6531

Category:

Collection:

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